Events

  • Community & Culture: Healing Our City

    • Tuesday, January 18, 2022 at 05:30 PM
    • Zoom

    Join us as we find a CURE:

    • Cultivating a culture of belonging 
    • Understanding our differences 
    • Restoring individuals to wholeness 
    • Educating the community 
    • Youth are strongly encouraged to participate so we can hear from them as our future leaders;
    • Together we can heal the community of the ills of racism, address the grief and anxiety for victims of trauma, and strategize sustainable and transformative actions for Durham's beloved communities.

    This event is sponsored by the City of Durham's Neighborhood Improvement Services, Office on Youth, and Equity and Inclusion Departments.  Additional  sponsors include Durham Congregations in Action, a collaborative of diverse faith communities who address racial justice, social equity, and human dignity in an effort to overcome poverty, racism and violence.  (We are still confirming all sponsoring organizations' role).

    Register at: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_iJ3ZprayQaWbQdba03GfvQ

    About the National Day of Racial Healing:

    Established by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, (the following is directly quoted from their site) the National Day of Racial Healing is an opportunity for individuals, communities and organizations to acknowledge our shared humanity, restore our trust in each other, build authentic relationships and inspire collective action on #HowWeHeal from the effects of racism.

    About the Human Relations Commission:

    The Durham City Council created the Durham Human Relations Commission on October 7, 1968 during a time of much racial strife in the city between its white and black residents. The primary responsibilities of the 17-member board involved working to eradicate discrimination and to develop an atmosphere in the city conducive to good human relations. The commission worked with the department to achieve these objectives. Over the years the commission’s membership has changed to reflect a more diverse body that represents the entire city. Throughout its existence, the commission and the department have provided human relations forums, workshops, conferences and other activities with 1 goal in mind: To improve human relations among the people of Durham.  One of it's primary duties (as stated in the City's Ordinance) is "To provide open channels of useful communication among the various racial, religious, ethnic and economic groups in the city and between those groups and the city council so that misunderstandings and wide differences leading to conflict may be ameliorated."